How Obesity Affects the Brain

Obesity rates have tripled worldwide since 1975, and as of 2016, 39% of adults were overweight while 13% were obese.1 Associated health risks like heart disease and diabetes are well known, but many aren’t aware that your brain may also be affected by obesity. Rates of neurodegenerative disorders, including dementia, are also on the rise, with an estimated 115 million people expected to be living with dementia by 2050.2 It’s possible that rising rates of obesity may be one driving force behind this growing burden — and one that’s largely preventable at that. Obesity May Shrink Your BrainResearch published in Radiology found that obesity may lead to alterations in brain structure, shrinking certain regions.3 Among men, higher total body fat percentage was linked to lower brain gray matter volume. Specifically, 5.5% greater total body fat percentage was associated with 3,162 mm3 lower gray matter volume.4

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Treating Mercury Toxicity With Emeramide

Haley’s Alzheimer’s Research
Haley took a position with the Alzheimer’s Center, a research center for Alzheimer’s disease, where he collaborated with a former graduate student of his. The NIH funded their research for five years, which used Haley’s technology to assess the differences of ATP, GDP and cyclic AMP-binding proteins in normal brains versus those with Alzheimer’s disease.”There were dramatic differences,” he says. For example, the enzyme creatine kinase, which is a fundamental enzyme, is 98 percent inhibited in Alzheimer’s patients. They also discovered that tubulin — a major brain protein that holds an axon in its extended form and controls the growth direction of axons and dendrites — is inhibited by more than 80 percent. In 1989, he published the paper2 “Aberrant guanosine triphosphate-beta-tubulin interaction in Alzheimer’s disease” in the Annals of Neurology, stating that “These results support the hypothesis that microtubule formation is abnormal in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease.”Haley goes on to recount the story of how he got into trouble with the NIH when he decided to investigate the influence of heavy metals on Alzheimer’s susceptibility. A popular theory at the time was that Alzheimer’s was caused by aluminum toxicity. Using his technology, he was able to show that mercury was the only heavy metal capable of causing a normal brain to develop the same biochemical abnormalities — including abnormal tubulin — that you find in Alzheimer’s disease. Haley claims his research has since been replicated and confirmed. According to Haley, mercury causes the synaptic clefts to disappear and triggers the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a major diagnostic hallmark of Alzheimer’s, by causing abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

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